When you offer periodic maintenance.....

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When you offer periodic maintenance.....

Postby rharvey » Mon Mar 31, 2014 11:59 pm

When you offer periodic maintenance what items do you preform on their PC.
ie what to you consider to be regular maintenance?

Do you consider a check up to be the same as maintenance?

if you do not consider a check up to be the same as maintenance, what do you consider to be a checkup?

thank you for your help in advance.

Robert
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Re: When you offer periodic maintenance.....

Postby xide » Wed Apr 02, 2014 2:39 pm

For me when a customer asks for any sort of tune up or maintenance I discover there problem is because they're infected with viruses and that's why their computer is running the way it is.

However in such a situation that the system is clean. I would run diagnostic tests to check the hardware, disable unneeded startup programs, uninstall or disable tool bars and BHO that are causing slow browser speed, uninstall unneeded or unused programs, clean out temp files and registry with ccleaner. Lastly install every windows update available and run defrag.
If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense.....Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle. I'm afraid I can't explain myself, sir. Because I am not myself, you see?
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Re: When you offer periodic maintenance.....

Postby Xander » Thu Apr 03, 2014 11:29 am

^^pretty much the same^^

I'll also throw in a few basic scanners to check that there's not sneaky stuff behind the scenes but, yeah, most tuneups are in because the browser gets bogged down more than anything.
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Re: When you offer periodic maintenance.....

Postby xide » Thu Apr 03, 2014 10:53 pm

Oh and if their antivirus is expired or non-existant then I will also install a free one on there
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Re: When you offer periodic maintenance.....

Postby Xander » Fri Apr 04, 2014 12:06 pm

xide wrote:Oh and if their antivirus is expired or non-existant then I will also install a free one on there
Whereas I will go for the upsell.
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Re: When you offer periodic maintenance.....

Postby xide » Fri Apr 04, 2014 10:34 pm

Xander wrote:Whereas I will go for the upsell.


I assumed an upsell would be moot at this point. I assumed this is after the customer already had explained what they wanted and you have already priced out the service they requested which is "regular maintenance" as started in the original question.

rharvey wrote:When you offer periodic maintenance what items do you preform on their PC.
ie what to you consider to be regular maintenance?

Do you consider a check up to be the same as maintenance?

if you do not consider a check up to be the same as maintenance, what do you consider to be a checkup?

thank you for your help in advance.


Maybe rharvey will make a new post "what other stuff can I upsell when someone gets regular maintenance" i'm sure you can give him all kinds of ideas ;)
If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense.....Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle. I'm afraid I can't explain myself, sir. Because I am not myself, you see?
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Re: When you offer periodic maintenance.....

Postby rharvey » Sun Apr 06, 2014 9:58 pm

Maybe rharvey will make a new post "what other stuff can I upsell when someone gets regular maintenance" i'm sure you can give him all kinds of ideas ;)


I had a customer ask me what regular maintenance consisted of.
I wanted to make sure I had a good list and was doing every thing most people considered regular maintenance.

That being said, what other stuff do you upsell when they come ask for regular maintenance?
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Re: When you offer periodic maintenance.....

Postby xide » Mon Apr 07, 2014 12:04 am

The sky is the limit, it all comes down to how well you can explain the "proof" that they need said items you recommend but in terms they can relate to. I have a few tactics I use by reading people. For example I see some guy come in with a big truck or something like an SS camero...then I know to relate them to car parts. You just got to generalize something they would understand when trying to sell a product.

So before I take in the computer, typically it's a virus removal because I think i've had 2 "just maintenance" in the 8 years we've been open. So when the customer brings it in for a virus removal or a "I don't know...its just slow" Then I will ask is they have anti-virus protection first. More often than most, I will hear "Yeah I do, I have no idea how it happened then. They guy at Wal-Mart said it's the best" So I have a printout on my wall of AVTest's scores on my wall, and I will point to it and see where theirs ranked. They are typically shocked that the guy from Wal-Mart didn't know better, so I always inform them to ask a professional instead of someone that doesn't work in the industry.

My biggest sell though is how I act, I simply act as if i'm just passing on friendly information. "Every year I keep the scores updated and we will only sell who is number one at the time. You are free to always come in to view them even if you don't wish to buy from me. However we are partnered and will usually sell them for less" and yes I really do partner with any anti-virus company I decide to deal with. but with this friendly attitude you will more likely get a buyer. I've had customers come back 6 months for anti-virus after their Wal-Mart one ran out.

Now while you're performing the job you will notice some obviously check for some things such as how much ram they have (and recommend for their AV) and hard drive space. Those would be the most important and d7 will let you know if those items are low. If hard drive space is nearly full I would always call and suggest a larger hard drive. In which case I would sell them the drive, and do the maintenance (or reformat) and offer them to clone/install for free because everyone loves to get a deal ;)

Around Christmas time until Jan.1 of this year I was offering 2 specials which kept me very busy during the holidays when i'm usually slow at that time. I did a special for virus removal + anti-virus = $99 ($80 profit) or a reformat + anti-virus = $75 ($55 profit) It sounds cheap to most, but this town has an average income of $25k/year, and most live paycheck to paycheck. I only put this special on facebook and our website only. I was getting at least 5 of these a day when usually i'm slow at this time, some were even doing it as a Christmas gift. Surprisingly a lot of them still had a current anti-virus (saw one that didn't expire for OVER a year) yet they still wanted mine instead because of my chart I printed out.

Most importantly ALWAYS explain to them that there is no anti-virus that is 100%, but some are better than others. Never lie about anything either when trying to sell something to someone. Someone else may call you out on it and prove it to the customer. For example I had a customer who took their computer to 3 shops, they all said it was a motherboard and wanted to basically build them a new one. It was a power switch (manually jumped it to determine) I charged them $10, they instantly knew they would never go to those other places that tried to rip them off, and sent all their friends to me because I was honest. When I hear someone took it somewhere else I always assume the previous place try to rip them off and sadly i'm right about 75% of the time (That's due to the type of people in this city I think) so always be honest and give a fair price, because they may take it to someone else that wants to charge them more for the same work or the customer may be testing you, to see if you're honest (unplugged a cable then brought it in).

I talk way too much, so here is an easy recap:

1. Ask if they have anti-virus first, make sure they're aware of how their current AV is rated and how it may compare to yours that you sell. (Don't forget...none are 100%, but some are better than others)
2. Personally I run diagnostics on all hardware before I start anything (this can save time in the long run if you have a hard drive that failing)
3. View specs of system, and notify them of and bad or hardware that needs upgraded.
4. Begin requested service.
5. If customer declines and upgrades, make sure you list it as what you recommend on the report you give them. (This will sometimes have them come back when they want it. They usually want to check prices first.)
6. When the customer picks up computer verbally remind them what may need to be upgraded and put it in terms they will understand. "Your processor is like the engine of your car, and your ram are like the fuel injectors" for example. Then explain how it works in relation to their computer. "therefore the larger amounts of ram, the more your operating system and programs can use to keep things flowing, causing the system to be more efficient. Because if only some programs are hogging all your fuel, because there isn't much to go around then other programs will suffer an cause them to go slower." (A lot of my customers are car/truck guys)

7. Another idea I had was to offer some sort of gift cards, but since I lived in a small poor town I wasn't sure how well it would do. But the gift cards would be the price of something like 4 virus removals, and they get a 5th on free. Gift cards are great if they expire after a year...or even never. If you think about it, some may never need to come back because you did good work and explained to them how to stay safe, or if they give it to a family member or friend (that's a new customer for you, that may spread how great you are), or if they lose their card. So what if you're giving a free service away if you sell 4. You'll see the rewards if done right. Oh and if you do this, make sure you get something like professional business cards make...something like full gloss, full color, with your logo and other items like the numbers 12345 circled each one so you can hole punch it each time. 2-sided would be a great option too! This will help prevent forgery and you can get about 250 cards printed for about $10, which is a small amount in comparison to the rewards you will get. even if you sell your cards at $100 x 250 cards = $25,000

8. And I typically only try to upsell Anti-virus if needed (or not working as good as it should)
any bad hard ware obviously.
Any hardware that would allow them to increase performance. within reason, and what they use their computer for. I will suggest what is best for their needs.
(I'm not going to up sell an an 80 year old woman 16GB of ram when she only uses it to play Candy crush and email her grand children) because that's not ethical.

My list is basically for any service I do, mainly because I run diagnostics first, view system specs and see what programs they use, and I ask the customer what they use the computer for mainly (school, gaming, just facebook, etc.)
This information should help you out. Sorry it's so long, I tend to get carried away some times. If you need to know anything else you can feel free to contact me via PM
If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense.....Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle. I'm afraid I can't explain myself, sir. Because I am not myself, you see?
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Re: When you offer periodic maintenance.....

Postby Marshall » Thu Apr 10, 2014 8:49 pm

A "Check Up" infer's that you're going to get some hands on TLC. You bring out the red carpet, put on the white gloves, and flip on the party lights. This should include TONS of great stuff (see a common list below) that just can't be automated (customize their browser, load their favorite program on startup, spend 5 minutes talking about their email spam and show them how to make a filter), and it should have more than one personal touch to how the service is performed so that people don't have a feeling like it's generic...GENERIC = BAD, no one remembers generic, they remember unique...be unique. Remember to charge a fair price for your time involved, and don't include too much into your flat rate service if you can't afford to pay yourself for the invested time to do a quality job.

Regular, scheduled, maintenance should be something like dSS, or using d7II's pre-built maintenance settings on their PC as part of a Plan you sell to them (subscription service, monthly, 3 months, etc.). It should be automated, and cost you virtually no time to do it (I suggest dSS).

WHATEVER you're doing, don't give one service the appearance that it's dwarfed by the other, unless you actually want to. My suggestion is lead a conversation with your premium offering, and don't even consider discussing the lowbie service until it looks like they may not buy, or flat out say no to your premium offering.

I always point out that a One time fix, will not "Fix" their issues. I lead a conversation based on the merits of the value of ongoing services. You'll have to develop your own way to handle your talk to convince someone to not just do a single one-off maintenance. I don't suggest you cut your prices to get the sale. Include value, price the value, re-price your service, and if someone buy's it great you've turned a profit. If you just cut prices so you make a sale easier, you're going to head down a one way street of pain.

rharvey wrote:
I had a customer ask me what regular maintenance consisted of.


This is easy to avoid. Lots of people want to "know" what you do to their computer. You should always tell them. But how do you blurt out 4,000 different things that you're doing to their PC or that you may do, if it's needed?

Make a basic maintenance list, the most common things you do, and put it on a business card, flyer, on your website, and label it a special name for your "Super-Xide-Maintenance Service w/Electrolytes". It could go something like this...

* Removal of "Clutter" Files
* We Update your Common Software (Java, Adobe Reader, etc.)
* Required System Updates (Keeps bad stuff from getting in, and keeps your PC working)
* Tons of minor tweaks to maximize system performance (Defragging, Fewer Programs on Startup, etc.)
* Courtesy Virus Scan (Will notify you IMMEDIATELY of a serious infection, we'll clean the easy ones for FREE!)
* Diagnostic Report (Yours to keep)
* 10% off next XXXXXXXX-Maintenance Service Coupon Card after purchase

Now when they ask, hand them your card, flyer, etc. Now you're not stuck standing their talking for an hour while they debate the "merits" of whether or not they really need that XXXX-Maintenance Service, and you're moving on to the next job.

Also...

Have a go-to list for "HOT" upsells ready to go at a moments notice. This could be an AV product you're a reseller of, dSS, whatever. When you identify a problem from your Diagnostic Process (because you're running one on every PC that enters the shop...right?), you contact the client and offer to take care of the problem for $$$$$$, or offer them a monthly plan so they don't pay a lot of $$$ up front, but have a dependable, ongoing service. Package it how it works best for you, but I would always advise knowing exactly what you're able to sell, so that even if it's in a passing 30 second conversation you can say "Oh yeah we can fix that for $$$, and we can take care of that for you right now!".

Xide also pointed out another great strategy (one of my favorites), and I'm going to tweak it a bit for you. What may work for you, may not work for others.

When you give your client their Diagnostic Report, have an area available to fill in recommendations. Also leave an area next to each recommendation that requires their signature to sign off on denying the service, and that you have informed them of the "down-sides" of. Now they get to keep a written copy of why you recommended it, and you have some CYA in the event they come back one day and say "Oh but you never recommended that!", because you did and you have a signed copy stored on a .pdf on your computer. This isn't a scare tactic, or meant to force or even push people into a sale. This is purely about ensuring that your client understands that your recommendation is serious, and that there will be repercussions for ignoring it, and it won't be your fault. Obviously you don't make silly recommendations like "Buy a new computer from us, because yours is slow", or "You need a RAM upgrade". Your recommendations need to be packed with irrefutable evidence like "Our Diagnostic Report shows that your hard drive is showing signs of failure. Failure to create a copy of your data, and replace the hard drive, may result in permanent loss of your data. We recommend that you purchase our Super-Xide-DataRecovery Service for $$$$$$ to.....resolution here". Now it's in terms anyone should be able to understand without going all Tech lingo on them, they know it's serious, and they know you're offering to fix it for them, but if they say no, they know that you're recording that you warned them of the risks and you're not at fault/liable...again it's all about informing them, and CYA for you!

I want to expand on xide's #7 topic a bit. Marketing a "gift card".

Your goal, is to get them to come back (if you're not selling them a Plan that covers all of their needs, and getting a monthly payment, then what are you doing to get them to come back? Relying on your Awesomeness?). Here are some suggestions on how to get customers to feel great, and want to return
(It won't matter IF; your service isn't good, you don't answer your phone, run late, and all around can't talk to people)

* 6 month gift card % off a service
* Silver, Gold, Premium, Diamond, Elite (whatever), membership card for spending $$$ money, entitling them to $$$ off their next service (valid for 1 year), or a % off all services etc. Treat someone like they're part of an elite crowd, and they'll come back every time. I like to put a different phone # on the card, that is the 99% pickup rate phone #. You could use this to generate referrals too by handing them one for a friend, give them a Family Pack of cards, etc.
* "I O U" card, guaranteeing them a service for free (only given to someone who spends $$$ on a purchase)

I also want to point out one last fact. When you go to a retail store, and you are going to check out. How often do they try to sell you something else, directly or indirectly?

A Direct Up-sell would be "I'm glad we were able to take care of your PC today. Your purchase qualifies you for a 75% discount off of our personalized Home Backup Software (whatever you like selling), would you be interested? We will do the install for free, and perform regular updates for free if you schedule an appointment with us.

An Indirect Up-sell would be, having a "Add to Cart" favorite item when they checkout on your website offering that 75% discount if they add it to their order now, or having a rack of hard drives right at your cash register as they check-out with BIG Discount labels all over them, or ON SALE, HOT (lil jalapeno picture).

Wal-Mart makes a killing off of people as they check-out with those tiny little isles...a killing people. Why shouldn't you have a way to offer someone something else, right before you let them walk right out the door? Food for thought.
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Re: When you offer periodic maintenance.....

Postby rharvey » Sat May 31, 2014 4:50 pm

xide wrote:This information should help you out. Sorry it's so long, I tend to get carried away some times. If you need to know anything else you can feel free to contact me via PM


Thank you for taking the time to explain.
If I may ask what Av list do you prefer?
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